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Why water?

 

 

16,000 children under age of 5 die every day from water borne diseases.

 663 million people on the planet still don't have clean water

 According to Dr. Batmanghelidj, Author of the Best Seller Your Body's Many cries for Water and Water: For Health, For Healing, For Life and most of all: Water cures: Drugs Kill., Clean water is the most essential human necessity for living.

It's hard not to concern about how safe our water is today. But forget about us. Most of us have never really been thirsty in the western world. We've never had to drink water from the same river where all the dumping and cleaning go to. We don't have to drink the contaminated water from the post war soil which was poisoned with agricultural pesticides and industrial chemicals, virus and bacteria which kill 16000 children a day.  We simply turn on the tap, and water comes out. Clean. Yet there are 663 million people on the planet who don't have clean water.

That's a huge number. In fact, it's twice the number of people who live in the United States. 1 in 10 people in our world doesn’t have access to the most basic of human needs. Something we can't imagine how many children die a day with water borne diseases under age of 5.

Here, we'd like to introduce you to a few of those 663 million. They are very real, and they need our help. They didn't choose to be born into a village where the only source of water is a polluted swamp or dirty and contaminated rivers and lakes. They assumed that rain water was good even though due to severe pollution, rain water has become acid rain and is no longer safe to drink. They have no choice but to drink the dirty water and hope that they may survive without diseases. These are suffering people in the developing countries in Asia.

HEALTH

Diseases from dirty water kill more people every year than all forms of violence, including war. 43% of those deaths are children under five years old. Access to clean water and basic sanitation can save around 16,000 lives every day.

TIME

UNICEF said the 200 million hours women and girls spend every day collecting water is a colossal waste of their valuable time. “When water is not on premises and needs to be collected, it’s our women and girls who are mostly paying with their time and lost opportunities,”

Access to clean water gives communities more time to grow food, earn an income, and go to school -- all of which fight poverty

We invite you to put yourself in their shoes. Now, make a decision to help. We're not offering grand solutions and billion dollar schemes, but instead, simple things that work. Filters that can prevent water borne diseases.

 

WATER IN CRISIS - VIETNAM

Located in the Southeastern part of Asia, Vietnam's population totals to over 86 million with an estimated GDP per capita of $3100. Vietnam is the 13th most populous country in the world and almost two-thirds of its people live along the country's three main river basins- Thai Binh, Mekong Delta and Dong Nai.

Vietnam has 2360 rivers totaling to more than 10 km and it would appear that this should provide copious supply of water to the nation. However, due to the lack of physical infrastructure and financial capacity there is low utilization of the supply along with an uneven distribution of rain fall resulting in water shortages throughout the country. Although Vietnam has improved its water supply situation in the past few decades, many rural parts of the country who are often the poorest communities, have not seen significant improvement. It is reported that only 39% of the rural population has access to safe water and sanitation. The rural population has moved from using surface water from shallow dug wells to groundwater pumped from private tube wells. In the Northern region of Vietnam around Hanoi, there is evidence of arsenic contamination in the drinking water. About 7 million people living in this area have a severe risk of arsenic poisoning and since elevated levels of arsenic can cause cancer, neurological and skin problems, this is a serious issue.

In addition, due to the rapid economic development in Vietnam, river water quality has been affected along with an increased concentration of various toxins in the water. The surface water in the rivers is locally polluted by organic pollutants such as oil waste and solids. There is also pollution from untreated waste water released by industries and agriculture activities. The geography and topography of Vietnam also makes the country susceptible to natural hazards such as typhoons, storms, floods and drought. This then leads to a multitude of problems such as water pollution and waterborne diseases along with an impact on agricultural lands and livestock. Both the environmental pollution in these river basins and natural disasters affects the nation's public health. The Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment state that almost 80% of the diseases in Vietnam are caused by polluted water. There are many cases of cholera, typhoid, dysentery and malaria each year in the country.

It is without doubt that agriculture has the largest burden on water resources in Vietnam. Vietnam is one of the richest agricultural regions in the world and a top producer and consumer of rice. Currently, water used for agriculture purposes take up over 80% of total water production. Paddy rice is the primary crop that takes up a majority of the total irrigated area. Fisheries, aquaculture, industries and services also contribute to water demand increase.

Water resources are very significant, especially natural water sources in the rural areas of Vietnam as they are the sources of economic, social and cultural activities. The government of Vietnam is tackling the water resources management issues in the country by implementing policies and programs relating to this. Some of the challenges that still exist include improving access to clean water and sanitation for both urban and rural population, improving public participation and knowledge and strengthening river basin management.